Photographer Gets A Tattoo Of The Dinosaur That Was Named After Her

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Alberta photographer Wendy Sloboda has been photographing fossils for 30 years, and she has a gift for dinosaur hunting. Her work has led to the classification of new species, and a discovery she made five years ago was given the name Wendiceratops Pinhornensis in her honor. Royal Ontario Museum paleontologist David Evans told CBCnews:

The paleontologists dig at sites discovered the previous year — often by Sloboda, Evans says.

“We often joke that we’re Wendy’s cleanup crew because Wendy runs around the badlands and finds all this cool stuff and we basically come in afterwards and do the digging,” he added. “She just has a sixth sense for finding good specimens.”

Sloboda drives out to other areas and hikes with a small group, usually students, to go “prospecting” — looking for rocks sticking out of the dirt that she recognizes as fossils from their unusual colour, texture or shininess.

“It’s really hard to explain,” she said.

An image of the hippo-sized horned dinosaur which is related to the triceratops and lived 75 to 79 million years ago, is now tattooed on Wendy’s arm.

(Marilyn Terrell via Neatorama)

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